Platforms to receive comments on one's article

+7 votes
72 views
asked Aug 7, 2015 in Open Science by Franck Dernoncourt (540 points)

When publishing an article, assuming that the publisher doesn't prevent it, I would like to post the article in some places where I could receive comments on it. What are good platforms to receive comments on one's articles?



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6 Answers

+4 votes
answered Aug 7, 2015 by just_curious (60 points)

For the research fields covered by the ArXiv, you could use the Reviews section of ArXiv Analytics (which is a platform that provides an advanced user interface for reading and discussing ArXiv eprints).



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commented Aug 18, 2015 by Franck Dernoncourt (540 points)
I moved the question to http://academia.stackexchange.com/q/51813/452 feel free to repost your answer there. Thanks!

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+3 votes
answered Aug 9, 2015 by Scott Chamberlain (410 points)
  • I wonder if anyone has played with doing so on Medium? I think anyone can post there, and they have nice paragraph level annotation.
  • Hypothes.is is a nice annotation tool for the web. I don't know if they have any integration with publications though. Googling, found that the Journal of Electronic Publishing has integration with Hypothes.is, check it out at http://quod.lib.umich.edu/j/jep/3336451.0017.201?view=text;rgn=main (See the hypothes.is stuff on the right of the screen) - I know this doesn't help you probably, but it perhaps you can lobby the folks at a place you'd like to put your articles.
  • PeerJ preprints has ability to receive comments, but they only post the pdf, so the comments can't be very granular.
  • GitHub: this is my personal favorite. You can get very granular comments on your article, receive pull requests, discuss things in the issue tracker, etc. However, I guess you'd have to reach out to people to get comments, maybe not ideal.


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commented Aug 18, 2015 by Franck Dernoncourt (540 points)
I moved the question to http://academia.stackexchange.com/q/51813/452 feel free to repost your answer there. Thanks!

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commented Aug 18, 2015 by Daniel Standage (420 points)
+1 for Hypothes.is, I hope it really takes off!

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commented Aug 18, 2015 by rmounce (110 points)
+1 for Hypothes.is . There really is no need imo for a separate platform. We should just annotate wherever and whenever using open web annotation standards... which is what Hypothes.is and tools like it have implemented already! We just need to get people to be aware of them and adopt them!

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commented Aug 18, 2015 by Carlisle Rainey (70 points)
Though I haven't used it, Hypothes.is sounds great. [Here](http://learnbayes.org/papers/confidenceIntervalsFallacy/) is an example of it in use, and [here](http://bayesfactor.blogspot.com/2015/08/on-radical-manuscript-openness.html) is a blog post discussing it.

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+3 votes
answered Aug 9, 2015 by Thomas (915 points)

One option is PubPeer, which doesn't host articles itself but rather allows you to comment on articles based on DOI. There's also a browser extension that allows you to see the comments in-line on various publishers' websites. As in Scott's comments about PeerJ, this only supports commenting on the article as a whole, not in-line commenting.



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commented Aug 18, 2015 by Franck Dernoncourt (540 points)
I moved the question to http://academia.stackexchange.com/q/51813/452 feel free to repost your answer there. Thanks!

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+2 votes
answered Aug 14, 2015 by brucellino (20 points)

A new platform for the Computer Science community is GitXiv shows a combined view of the github repository, the arxiv submission and a discussion panel. This might be of use, if you're interested in the computer science domain. It can likely be re-tooled for other domains.



This post has been migrated from the Open Science private beta at StackExchange (A51.SE)
commented Aug 18, 2015 by Franck Dernoncourt (540 points)
I moved the question to http://academia.stackexchange.com/q/51813/452 feel free to repost your answer there. Thanks!

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+1 vote
answered Aug 10, 2015 by Laurent Jégou (10 points)

some ideas :

  • Figshare offers comments, too.

  • Another solution is the scientific blog, hosted by the institution or on a specific platform. For example, in France we have Hypotheses.

  • Scientific social networks like Academia.edu or ResearchGate offers the possibility of comments, but, also, to seek and reach out colleagues and students to discuss your subject.

The last two options are, IMHO, better because of the greater Web visibility / reachability.



This post has been migrated from the Open Science private beta at StackExchange (A51.SE)
commented Aug 18, 2015 by Franck Dernoncourt (540 points)
I moved the question to http://academia.stackexchange.com/q/51813/452 feel free to repost your answer there. Thanks!

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+1 vote
answered Aug 14, 2015 by pocketfullofcheese (10 points)

Another platform is The Winnower, where you can post any article, or even blog posts, and receive a DOI, archival and have the opportunity to receive comments/peer reviews.

DISCLAIMER: I am affiliated with The Winnower.



This post has been migrated from the Open Science private beta at StackExchange (A51.SE)
commented Aug 18, 2015 by Franck Dernoncourt (540 points)
I moved the question to http://academia.stackexchange.com/q/51813/452 feel free to repost your answer there. Thanks!

This post has been migrated from the Open Science private beta at StackExchange (A51.SE)

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