What criteria does a research project need to match to be called open science?

+25 votes
659 views
asked Aug 4, 2015 in Open Science by kenorb (430 points)

What kind of formal or non-written rules/requirements does our project need to match and follow so we can say that our project is open science?

Is it only about research data which should be accessible to all?

What if the project doesn't make sense and it's publishing correlation data of the number of pirates with global temperature? Does it still match the criteria of 'open science' project?



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commented Aug 18, 2015 by Alexander Konovalov (135 points)
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commented Aug 18, 2015 by m0nhawk (270 points)
If there is a complete documentation, code and data, so anyone with a basic knowledge in the field can reproduce the results (and least statistically), they this will be an open science.

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commented Aug 18, 2015 by Ben Bolker (0 points)
I would say code/analysis pipelines as well as data must be open ...

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1 Answer

+2 votes
answered Mar 20 by Jeroen Bosman (50 points)
edited Mar 20 by Jeroen Bosman

A starting point could be to see whether it aligns with some of the more important charters and declarations already out there. An overview of all of these is at: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-aRXFiRg-VL9hpLpxoJqX6-OC-A0R2oCogHfIx52Nug/edit#gid=956616118.

Also, the Force11 workgroup on the scholarly commons is working on a set of high level principles.

But for those looking for just a quick cheat sheet this list of could/should/must things may be useful:

  • Think about the inclusiveness aspects of your project
  • Share your research topic ideas (e.g. through Rio/Journal of Brief Ideas)
  • Share your funding/grant proposal (even if you did not get the grant)
  • Preregister studies
  • Share data using FAIR
  • Document steps (e.g. OSF)
  • Share your code (e.g. using GitHub)
  • Use open hardware
  • Use open source software
  • Share early verions of your paper as working paper/preprint (in any of the preprint archives)
  • Use ORCID
  • Use as open as possible CC-licenses
  • Publish open access
  • Ideally publish actionable papers/graphics
  • Provide plain language explanations (e.g. through Kudos)
  • Foster translations of your abstracts/papers
  • Share your posters/presentations before/during conferences (e.g. on Zenodo, FigShare)
  • Actively connect with your audience
  • Check how your stuff is being used, e.g. by using altmetrics, and connect based on that

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